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Happy New Year! 8 HR Resolutions for 2018

Happy New Year! 8 HR Resolutions for 2018

New Year’s resolutions can help bring about positive change, whether in our personal lives or at work. With 2018 approaching, here are some HR resolutions to consider—and suggestions for helping make them stick. #1: Review your hiring procedures. Review your job advertisements, recruiting practices, application forms, interview questions, and screening and selection procedures to ensure they are effective and comply with all applicable laws. Avoid questions that could reveal a candidate’s protected class, such as age, disability, national origin, and religion. Additionally, depending on your jurisdiction, you may be prohibited from asking about an applicant’s criminal history (prior to making a conditional job offer) or salary history. #2: Create/update job descriptions. Written job descriptions can help you identify essential functions and qualifications needed for a role. They can also help you set clear expectations with employees, evaluate performance, make compensation decisions, identify training needs, handle requests for reasonable accommodations, and make exempt vs. non-exempt classification decisions. In 2018, review and update your job descriptions to make sure they accurately...

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Thanksgiving Cooking Is Finished But Here’s An Easy Recipe for Improving Your Job Descriptions

Thanksgiving Cooking Is Finished But Here’s An Easy Recipe for Improving Your Job Descriptions

Job descriptions can help you identify the essential functions of the job and the qualifications needed for a role. They can also help you set clear expectations with employees, evaluate performance, make compensation decisions, identify training needs, handle requests for reasonable accommodations, and make exempt vs. non-exempt classification decisions. Here are six guidelines for developing effective job descriptions: #1: Be consistent. To help make valid comparisons between jobs, use the same format for each job description. Generally, this includes: Job details: job title, supervisor’s title, exempt vs. non-exempt classification, a brief summary of the job, and the date the job description was created or last revised. Essential functions: job duties that an employee must be able to perform with or without a reasonable accommodation. Non-essential functions: additional tasks the employee may be required to perform during the course of his or her job, but are not essential to the job. Qualifications and skills: training, education, certification(s), and years of experience needed to perform the job. Physical demands and work...

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ADP Shares Five Steps to Become a Better Leader on Nasdaq’s TradeTalks

ADP Shares Five Steps to Become a Better Leader on Nasdaq’s TradeTalks

It’s that time of year when many companies are doing annual reviews and employees are thinking about their own performance as well as their relationship with their team and their boss. When you consider that nearly 50 percent of workers leave a company because they aren’t happy with their manager, now’s a good time to think about how to improve your leadership skills in order to retain your top talent. Jerome Gouvernel, Vice President and General Manager of ADP Ventures recently sat down with Jill Malandrino, Host of Nasdaq’s TradeTalks to share five steps to becoming a better leader. They include: Don’t take it personally, it’s not about you. What makes a leader successful is not a specific skill set but how well a leader’s skills fulfill the needs of those working around them. It’s about what your team requires of you as a leader. Identify what your team needs. Examine what you’ve asked of the team and how your actions can help drive their success. They may be...

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Four Ways To Check the Pulse Of A Workforce

Four Ways To Check the Pulse Of A Workforce

Most employers, and their advisers, probably wish they could peek into the minds of employees to understand what workers are thinking, gain perspective on day-to-day frustrations and use that information to help make employees’ lives easier. These vital insights can inform an employer’s ability to help employees feel more empowered, do great work, feel secure and supported in their organizational roles and to build a better company culture. Taking the pulse of a workforce shouldn’t be a guessing game. An informal process of ‘throwing ideas against the wall to see what sticks’ wastes time, wastes resources and only serves to frustrate employees. There are better ways to understand what makes employees tick. A good place to start is seeing work from their point of view. A recent ADP study, Fixing the Talent Management Disconnect, shows that there is a gap between how employers and employees 72% of employers believe performance reviews are an important milestone for career development, only 54% of employees agree. Further, only 15% of employees say...

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