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Celebrating Women in Sales that Inspire – Part One

By Dave Greenberg, Senior DVP Sales at ADP

There are so many aspects involved in fostering a healthy organizational culture that embraces diversity and inclusion. In one respect, it means encouraging an environment that is clear, firm and diligent around accepting every individual, irrespective of everything ranging from age, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and a variety of other qualities. In another respect, it means driving an aggressive agenda to make real and sustainable change.

I’m fortunate to be part of an organization that has a solid structure in place to support, promote and demand equality across multiple fronts. In 2018, we want to continue the positive momentum that ADP has created over the last nearly 70 years. This leads me to a topic that is at the forefront of every company’s agenda, especially in the month of March: gender parity.

In celebration of Women’s History Month and coming off International Women’s Day on March 8th, it’s a great time to reflect on where we were and where we are now. In the early 1900s, only about 9 percent of all women in the U.S. participated in the workforce. Fast forward to 2018, and women comprise of over 47 percent of the U.S. workforce.

Although as a nation we have made tremendous progress in the last century across many facets of equality, we must be even more diligent in our hiring and retention practices to ensure women continue to break through the glass ceiling.

I’m proud to say that the ADP is celebrating Women’s History Month by introducing our 2018 “Inspiring Women in Sales” series. We’re recognizing female leaders across the worldwide sales team and giving them an opportunity to share their success stories.

Meet some of that women that inspire us every day!

Ashley

Ashley Landry, Senior Director, Sales Automation

How long have you been at ADP and what has your career journey looked like?

I joined ADP almost 5 years ago. Prior to joining, I worked for SunGard Financial Services (now FIS) for 13 years. I graduated from Texas A&M University with a Computer Science Engineering degree and began my career as a consultant. After a large internal consultant engagement to implement a worldwide customer relationship management (CRM) solution for SunGard, I moved into a permanent Sales Automation position to manage the CRM solution (Salesforce.com).

What has been one career defining moment?

I pride myself in practical and effective solutions. Early in my career I defined a solution to drive sophisticated Marketing Automation integrated with our CRM solution and company website with a simple tool rather than significantly investing in a complex tool with a big name and functionality we did not require. The solution was innovative and met our team’s requirements. The simplicity helped drive adoption and ultimately sales success. That year my team received our first “Surfboard” award at Salesforce.com’s Dreamforce conference, being recognized for innovative Marketing Automation.

What do you think has made you an effective leader?

My motivation to “get things done” and keen sense of my co-workers’ strengths.

What is one piece of advice your current self would tell your younger self?

Be a better listener. This is something I continue to work on.

Janine

Janine LaMorte, Senior Division Vice President, Insurance Services Sales

How long have you been at ADP and what has your career journey looked like?

Upon graduating the University of Delaware and accepting my first job at ADP, I never would have fathomed I’d be celebrating 20 years of service with the same company. Looking back over those 20 years, it’s abundantly clear to me why I’ve stayed – and it was without a doubt a function of great leaders supporting my development and taking a series risks in different roles and businesses that kept me excited and engaged along the way. These opportunities ran the gamut from being a small business sales associate, to sales trainer, working in sales operations and now sales learning. In retrospect, what I learned the most though all of these transitions is to embrace new opportunity, be it lateral or upward since these experiences are critical to creating your own unique value proposition to the organization.

What has been one career defining moment?

Taking a lateral move from Small Business Services sales leadership to professional employer organization (PEO) sales leadership was one of the more challenging and satisfying moves I made. Joining a new business unit, building brand new relationships, and making it my business to add value challenged me in ways I never expected. Doing this inspired me to take even greater risks and gave me the confidence to take on future roles. That experience taught me how to be comfortable with the uncomfortable and how to work through uncertainty to solve problems and drive results.

What do you think has made you an effective leader?

Over my career, I realized that my leadership style is that of a collaborator. I’ve embraced my ability and tendency to listen and try to understand different points of view to move a team and a project forward. It also helps to build and sustain long term relationships in the short and the long term.

What is one piece of advice your current self would tell your younger self?

Get to know your strengths. Understand what’s unique that you bring to the table. Surround yourself with people who will be honest and support you. Then take a risk – and go!

Stay tuned for part two in our series!

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