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Partnering with a more human resource

ADP voted one of Working Mother's 100 Best Companies

What It Means to Support Working Mothers

Rita Mitjans, Chief Diversity & Corporate Social Responsibility Officer

Jobs and careers are a big part of our lives, but are not the only things that matter. Life changes, like the birth or adoption of a child, brings joy and at the same time, tremendous complexity to our life. It’s even more challenging when you’re a single parent.Although my daughter is now in college, I struggled with balancing work and family initially.Having a boss that gave me the flexibility to go to doctors’ appointments and drop her off at school allowed me to be less stressed and more productive – something that benefitted me and my company.The reality is that while my job hadn’t changed when I returned from maternity leave, my life had.

At ADP, we recognize this challenge — it’s another way we live our brand of “a more human resource,” and we also value what working mothers and their families can teach us. Our approach starts with listening to the working mothers in our associate base, having policies and benefits that address those needs, and then building a support system around them and their families, even extending to before they become mothers.

I’m proud to say that because of this approach, for the sixth year, ADP has been named to the “Working Mother 100 Best Companies” list for our leadership in creating programs to support working families. Through flexible work arrangements, networking and professional development resources, women at ADP are encouraged to continue to build their careers and families in parallel, in a way that works for them.

Looking back on my experience, I would not have been able to achieve my goals without my work and family support system, and I strive to provide the same amount of support to other women at ADP. Here are a few ways ADP helps working moms like me every day.

  1. Mentorship

Sometimes simply knowing that there are other people in similar situations is a comfort. At ADP, we make an effort to bring women together through various resource groups, so they can learn from each other.Groups like the International Women’s Inclusion Network and Women in Leadership Group provide advice and support for women at all levels of their career.

  1. Flexibility

If there’s one thing I’ve learned as a mother and business leader, it’s the importance of flexibility. This applies to both work and home life. As a leader, I care about results – not how much time someone spends in the office or what time they leave. This applies to both women and men – both are accountable as parents and associates of ADP. We have to provide people with the flexibility they sometimes need to accommodate their personal obligations while continuing to meet the needs of the business.For example, if someone’s hours need to be adjusted to make it home in time to pick up a child from school, we can make that work.Flexibility empowers people to give their best at work and at home and that provides the added benefit of increasing employee engagement.

  1. Culture

Mentorship, opportunity and flexibility ladder-up to the most influential challenge of all – creating an inclusive work culture where women feel empowered and are able to bring their whole self to work. Women make up more than 50 percent of our organization and represent more than $30 trillion in global purchasing power, so making sure they feel supported is both a business and economic imperative.

For more information about this award, please click here.

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1 Comment

  1. Congratulations to ADP for winning this award again! As a working (single) mother, the support that ADP encourages to working parents is something that makes me love my company and what I do! We as parents often want to lead by example in showing our children that you can be both successful professionally and in the home, and ADP partners with their employees to help accomplish that. 🙂

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